The Way of Tea

The World in a Bowl of Tea

It is bright and clear this San Francisco morning as I arrive for my tea lesson.  I climb the steps of an ordinary looking building, walk through the door, and enter the world of tea. The fragrance of incense and the gentle rustling of my sensei's kimono greet me from...

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A Japanese Garden

Here is a beautiful quote from the curator of the Portland Japanese Garden, Sadafumi Uchiyama. He expresses the essence of a tea garden and for me, the essence of Japanese art and culture....

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Deconstruction of a tea house

This is a fascinating deconstruction of a tea house. It's all glass, whereas tea houses of the past were dark, enclosed spaces where you could hardly see. Light and shadow were paramount aspects. But here - all is revealed. I would love to have tea in this space....

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Trillium satori

Yesterday, as I was walking through my garden with a friend, she discovered this wonderful and mysterious Trillium - a precious, native orchid. It was hidden away and I had no idea it was in the garden. Did I plant this years ago and forgot about it? A Trillum is...

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The Way of Tea

I am fortunate to study with Soei Christy Bartlett Sensei who narrates this video. Tea inspires my daily life. The practice is about living in this moment. What is that? It takes many forms, but one of the most beautiful is Chanoyu. http://youtu.be/O4tEdaNmwzA  ...

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Stones are priceless

Stones are priceless in Japan. I"ve seen gardens created in the 16th century that have stones and rocks imported from far away that are worth their weight in gold. Seriously. It"s part of the statement of a lord or king"s garden - or in Japan"s case - the Shogun"s...

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Camellias

In winter a Camellia is the preferred flower in the tearoom. It blooms from October through April. Each flower may last for several days but only the bud is used with a deciduous branch from a shrub or tree such as Viburnam or Fothergilla. The structure of the branch...

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About my garden

I first learned to garden when I lived at Green Gulch Zen Center in California. Green Gulch is a working organic farm that grows vegetables and flowers for market. I learned about Biodynamic farming, watched gardeners plant seeds in rows of dark rich earth, walked by...

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A tea gathering

In summer, guests come early for tea, before the heat of the day. The garden is sprinkled with water; the stepping stones glisten in the early morning light, moist and cool like a path through a forest. There is a sense of bridging, crossing over, proceeding deep into...

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The World in a Bowl of Tea

It is bright and clear this San Francisco morning as I arrive for my tea lesson.  I climb the steps of an ordinary looking building, walk through the door, and enter the world of tea. The fragrance of incense and the gentle rustling of my sensei's kimono greet me from...
Portland Japanese Garden

A Japanese Garden

Here is a beautiful quote from the curator of the Portland Japanese Garden, Sadafumi Uchiyama. He expresses the essence of a tea garden and for me, the essence of Japanese art and culture....

Deconstruction of a tea house

This is a fascinating deconstruction of a tea house. It's all glass, whereas tea houses of the past were dark, enclosed spaces where you could hardly see. Light and shadow were paramount aspects. But here - all is revealed. I would love to have tea in this space....

Trillium satori

Yesterday, as I was walking through my garden with a friend, she discovered this wonderful and mysterious Trillium - a precious, native orchid. It was hidden away and I had no idea it was in the garden. Did I plant this years ago and forgot about it? A Trillum is...

The Way of Tea

I am fortunate to study with Soei Christy Bartlett Sensei who narrates this video. Tea inspires my daily life. The practice is about living in this moment. What is that? It takes many forms, but one of the most beautiful is Chanoyu. http://youtu.be/O4tEdaNmwzA  ...