In winter a Camellia is the preferred flower in the tearoom. It blooms from October through April. Each flower may last for several days but only the bud is used with a deciduous branch from a shrub or tree such as Viburnam or Fothergilla.

The structure of the branch is what is most appreciated. During a tea gathering, which can last four hours, the Camellia bud will slowly open.

– excerpt A Tea Garden in Tivoli

Camellias grow well in moist mild winter areas like the Southeast, California and the Pacific Northwest. Here in Zone 5, I overwinter potted Camellias in a cold room in my house

Camellias are native to China and Japan. They grow well in moist mild winter areas.
Here in Zone 5, I overwinter potted Camellias in a cold room of my house

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This Camellia is called Shiro Wabisuke which I ordered
from Nuccio”s Nurseries
www.nucciosnurseries.com
It will have small, single white blossoms.

There are over 250 species of Camellias. The most widely grown are the Camellia Japonica. In the United States , Camellias grow well in moist, mild winter areas like the South, California, and the Pacific Northwest.

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Camellia Japonica with a branch of Fothergilla. The vase is a Native American Navajo pot.

Camellia Japonica with a branch of Arrowood Viburnam.
The vase is a Native American Navajo pot.

Camellia called Akebono

Camellia called Akebono “Dawn”. The vase is by the American potter Frances Palmer.

While the flowers are very beautiful, only the bud is used in Tea. It will slowly open during the tea gathering.

While the flowers are very beautiful, only the bud is used in Tea.
It will slowly open during the tea gathering.

Links:
Nuccio”s Nursery
Frances Palmer Pottery