Trillium satori

Yesterday, as I was walking through my garden with a friend, she discovered this wonderful and mysterious Trillium – a precious, native orchid. It was hidden away and I had no idea it was in the garden. Did I plant this years ago and forgot about it?

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A Trillum is loved for its flower, which is amazing, but also admired for the three large leaves that dress it. It’s called a ‘Wake Robin’.

I was so thrilled to find it. It’s a perfect flower for Chabana, a flower to use in the tea room. I couldn’t resist and cut one flower.

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Trillium in a bamboo basket in the shape of an arrow quiver by Matsumoto Hafu – signed on the back.

 

How beautiful. But then I found out that one should not cut Trillium as they spread by seed. And they’re rare. Oh no. I had cut-killed this beautiful wild thing from my garden.

But last night seeing this wild orchid during zazen meditation in the tea house – I could see the whole perfection of the universe in it. No kidding. And you would have too. Satori isn’t just for the few. It’s for all of us at anytime.

Gratitude to all plants and teachers.

30 billion dollars a year

I heard that gardeners spend 30 billion dollars a year on gardening stuff. That dollar amount is so huge I had to double check it on Google. It’s accurate.

What are we all spending money on? For me it’s perennial and annuals every spring. I’m making a woodland garden and searching for wonderful Lady Slippers, Maidenhair Ferns and Japanese Peonies. But what are other people spending their money on?

Yesterday I went to the annual Trade Secrets fundraising event nearby in Connecticut which features sales of rare plants and garden antiques. It was crowded with people who had turned out on a beautiful Saturday to buy… garden stuff!

Here’s what caught my eye:

First I made a bee line for Hillside Nursery which sells rare and delicate woodland plants. They have an amazing selection (more later).

Then I went to my favorite vendor Campo de Fiore. I can’t believe what they do with pots and plants in them. I had to restrain myself from getting a potted Begonia – I’m not having luck with potted plants, so I just admired what they had.

Campo de Firori exotic planting.

Campo de Firori exotic planting.

 

I really wanted to get this acorn or pineapple pot.

I really wanted to get this acorn or pineapple pot.

 

Then I got tempted by the mushrooms. I secretly want a garden filled with gnomes and magical mushrooms.

This giant fish is fantastic

This giant fish is fantastic

As you can see, I spent a long time here, but restrained myself. This fish terracotta adornment for the garden was about $1000.00. Yikes.

Then I strolled around.

I saw some antique garden furniture, but mostly I was looking for woodland perennial treasures. My garden is fairly restrained. Gnomes, fish, topiary and big stuff just don’t suit my garden or me – but I’m happy to fantasize.

These are the coolest topiary. I'm not sure what evergreen they are.

These are the coolest topiary. I’m not sure what evergreen they are.

Now these giagantic terracotta pots I could really use. But alas, they are very, very expensive. Maybe this is where the 30 billion starts to show up.

Now these gigantic terracotta pots I could really use. But alas, they are very, very expensive. Maybe this is where the 30 billion starts to show up.

But there was more and even more. I started to get overwhelmed.

Piles of pots

Piles of pots

And more piles of pots

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and piles of other gardening things

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Finally I got away and on my way home made it to oneof my favorite places for trees, shrubs and super perenials – Old Farm Nurseries

Geesh – look what they’ve got here!

What is this? Really?

What is this? Really?

So maybe this is some of what we are all buying that comes to 30 billion a year. A bit over the top for me. Yet I did come home with some delicate sweet wooland plants that I hope will flourish and prosper. Stay tuned.

Planting these wonderful woodlanders in my old woodpile. Cypripedium pubescens – Yellow Lady Slipper Podophyllum peltatum – Mayapple Diphylleia cymosa – Umbrella Leaf Adiantum pedatum - Maidenhair Fern

Planting these wonderful woodlanders in my old woodpile.
Cypripedium pubescens – Yellow Lady Slipper
Podophyllum peltatum – Mayapple
Diphylleia cymosa – Umbrella Leaf
Adiantum pedatum – Maidenhair Fern

 

The last of the Camellias

Winter is over and so too are Camellias. They bloom from December into early April. Here are the last blooms from my plants which I overwinter in a cold room in my house.

Camellia with branch of Cherry.
The vase is by the Navajo American artist Samuel Manymules.

 

Same branch of Cherry. Different Camellia and vase. This Shigaraki style vase is by Sue Kotulek

Same branch of Cherry. Different Camellia and vase.
This Shigaraki style vase is by Sue Kotulek

The light in the tea house is natural and wonderful when dark and dusky. It shows off this pale pink Camellia highlighted by the grey, subdued vase by Sue Kotulek. The branch is a budding Pussy Willow. the scroll reads: “Everyday is a good day.”

The light in the tea house is natural and wonderful when dark and dusky. It shows off this pale pink Camellia highlighted by the grey, subdued vase by Sue Kotulek. The branch is a budding Pussy Willow. The scroll reads:“Everyday is a good day.”

Not only are the buds of a Camellia beautiful, but so too are the glossy, green leaves. Here they are paired with a branch of budding Magnolia in a vase by Frances Palmer.

Not only are the buds of a Camellia beautiful, but so too are the glossy, green leaves. Here they are paired with a branch of budding Magnolia in a vase by Frances Palmer.

Flowers of late summer

Late summer is here. Goldenrod has appeared which is always the first sign of autumn. Purple loosestrife and Queen Anne’s Lace are everywhere in fields. Besides the flowers growing in my own garden, I’ve been out picking from the roadside.

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A bucket of wild flowers: purple Loosestrife, Queen Anne’s Lace, Black-eyed Susan, Daisy Fleabane, a Galardia that had self sown in the fields.

Here’s what I picked from my garden. All good flowers for Chabana as you will see.

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Flowers that are blooming now in my garden: Red Persicaria ‘Firetail’ or Mountain Fleeceflower, Salvia guaranitica ‘Black and Blue’, Oakleaf Hydrangea, a pink Mallow, and the yellow flower is a Wild Parsnip that self seeded.

 

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From top left clockwise: Mallow, Wild Parsnip, white Cosmos, Fleabane, Persicaria, Salvia, Buddlea, Hydrangea

 

One of the great joys of tea is flower arranging, or rather “placement of the flowers” for Chabana. Here you can see how we used the flowers blooming now.

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Spring is here

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It’s a very late spring and still cold, but how wonderful – the magnolia, cherry and daffodils are just now blooming. At last!

In February I started looking for signs of spring. The Witch Hazel blooms first in the midst of snow. As the weather started to warm and the snow began to melt, I looked closely at the ground to see if any bulbs were coming up, and sure enough there were early Snowdrops and Crocus, followed by Daffodils. It’s a time of expectation and hope such as no other in the year.

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